Home Energy How Does Geography Figure Into the Full Cost of Electricity?

How Does Geography Figure Into the Full Cost of Electricity?

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Not all power plants are the same. They certainly don’t cost the same to build or operate. But what if I told you that one number, dubbed the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), puts it all into black and white for decision makers: This plant’s electricity is cheaper than that one’s, or it isn’t.

LCOE is the estimated amount of money that it takes for a particular power plant to produce a kilowatt-hour of electricity over its expected lifetime and is typically expressed as cents per kilowatt-hour or dollars per megawatt-hour.

LCOE makes it easy to decide which plant to build if you’re a utility or a governing agency. Except that LCOE misses a few important location-based factors, such as fuel delivery costs, construction costs, capacity factors, utility rates, financing terms, and other geographically distinct items that contribute to the cost of a kilowatt-hour.

Despite these shortcomings, LCOE has become the de facto standard for cost comparisons among the general public, policymakers, analysts, advocacy groups, and other stakeholders. One number is readily understood, easily bandied about, and even more easily compared to any other number.