Home Energy Indium Selenide Takes on the Mantle of the New Wonder Material

Indium Selenide Takes on the Mantle of the New Wonder Material

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Is there a research institute with a more distinguished pedigree in graphene research than the University of Manchester? There certainly haven’t been any that have “gone all in” the way Manchester has with its construction of a $71 million graphene research facility near the campus, which is operated under the auspices of the newly established National Graphene Institute (NGI).

This dedication to graphene makes sense considering the fact that Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov were at Manchester when they became the first researchers to synthesize graphene—the advance for which they were awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics.

But now it appears that a new material developed at Manchester, based on indium selenide (InSe), has taken some of graphene’s spotlight at Manchester, at least in terms of meeting the demands of future super-fast electronics.

“Ultra-thin InSe seems to offer the golden middle between silicon and graphene,” said Geim in a press release. “Similar to graphene, InSe offers a naturally thin body, allowing scaling to the true nanometer dimensions. Similar to silicon, InSe is a very good semiconductor.”