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Graphene Makes Infinite Copies of Compound Semiconductor Wafers

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Despite graphene’s amazing properties and all the engineering that has gone into giving the wonder material a band gap, its prospects for digital logic remain as much in doubt as they have ever been.

But the list of uses for graphene in electronics outside of digital logic continues to grow. The latest comes from research out of MIT in which graphene could make the use of exotic semiconductors more accessible to industries by preparing semiconductor thin films without the high cost of using bulk wafers of the materials.

In research described in the journal Nature, a thin film of graphene is placed on top of a gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafer. Then compound semiconductors—which are made of more than one element such as gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium phosphide (InP) and indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs)—are grown on top of that graphene layer in an epitaxy process.